GUIDE: New York

  •  

    Fornino Williamsburg

    291 Kent Ave.

    Williamsburg

    Cuisine: Italian, Pizza

    $$

    An industry veteran who opened his first restaurant in 1977, Fornino’s chef and owner, Michael Ayoub, became the first Brooklyn chef to be reviewed by The New York Times, and was dubbed the “First Chef of Brooklyn” by them. READ REVIEW

  •  

    Fort Defiance

    365 Van Brunt St.

    Red Hook

    Cuisine: New American

    $$

    This restaurant possesses that rare ability to transform itself from casual café to romantic bistro after the sun sets over Red Hook’s storied piers, once the workplace of thousands of hungry longshoremen. The owner, Pegu Club alum St. John Frizell, plays keep behind a tidy bar, while an eye-catching crowd from the neighborhood nibbles deviled eggs and sips house-made sodas while guarding the fort against the inevitable onslaught from Manhattan. READ REVIEW

  •  

    Gente Ristorante Italiano

    153 E. 45th St.

    Midtown East

    Cuisine: Italian

    $$$

    Great Italian food—from a menu that seems to go on forever—is hiding in plain sight, just around the corner from Grand Central. READ REVIEW

  •  

    Gnoccheria by Luzzo's

    234 E. 4th St.

    East Village

    Cuisine: Italian

    $

    Given the unqualified success of Luzzo’s, Ovest, and DaMikele, Michele Iuliano could have gone on making the Neapolitan-style pizza he’s built an empire around. But sometimes a chef has to follow a new idea—and at Gnoccheria, Iuliano has done just that. READ REVIEW

  •  

    Good Move

    167 Nassau Ave.

    Greenpoint

    Cuisine: Mexican

    $

    A quick scan of the two orange menus at this casual-as-can-be spot reveals their passions: mezcal, craft cocktails, and straightforward Mexican fare with a few twists. READ REVIEW

  •  

    Gradisca

    126 W. 13th St.

    West Village

    Cuisine: Italian

    $$$

    Sexy is the only word to describe the candlelit, subterranean space, with its exposed brick, wide-plank floors, and bloodred walls. As for the food—the centerpiece of which is the traditional pasta made fresh by Galeano’s own mamma—that would do with anything from seductive or satisfying to just plain delicious. READ REVIEW

  •  

    Hank's Juicy Beef

    84 Chambers St.

    Tribeca

    Cuisine: Sandwich

    $

    The man behind the meat is Henry Tibensky, a Chicago-area native who found himself in NYC over a decade ago with no place to score the beloved Italian beef sandwiches that were a staple during his youth in Oak Park, Illinois. READ REVIEW

  •  

    Hecho en Dumbo

    354 Bowery

    NoHo

    Cuisine: Mexican

    $$

    A light coating of vinegar-spiked oil clings like dew to each julienned strip of radish in the tangy ensalada de rábano. Delicious. But what are those silver-dollar-size slivers with the cherry pink centers, pretty enough to wear as a brooch? The chef, who just made the salad, is but a few feet away, looking out occasionally across the counter from the eat-in bar, so why not ask? Without missing a chop, Danny Mena shoots back: “Watermelon radishes, from Satur Farms on Long Island.” READ REVIEW

  •  

    Highlands

    150 W. 10th St.

    West Village

    Cuisine: Bar, British, Pub, Steak

    $$

    Highlands exudes the spirit of of a comfortable, well-worn neighborhood tavern, a place where you’d expect to spot the bartenders chatting up regulars. This combination of coziness and sophistication has kept the Scottish pub packed just about every night since it opened in 2007. READ REVIEW

  •  

    Hill Country

    30 W. 26th St.

    Flatiron

    Cuisine: Barbeque

    $$

    Hill Country has become the superlative city ’cue, its Texas dry-rub style—smoked “low and slow” over post oak—even making some critics’ national best barbecue lists. READ REVIEW


x