GUIDE: New York

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    Gnoccheria by Luzzo's

    234 E. 4th St.

    East Village

    Cuisine: Italian

    $

    Given the unqualified success of Luzzo’s, Ovest, and DaMikele, Michele Iuliano could have gone on making the Neapolitan-style pizza he’s built an empire around. But sometimes a chef has to follow a new idea—and at Gnoccheria, Iuliano has done just that. READ REVIEW

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    Gradisca

    126 W. 13th St.

    West Village

    Cuisine: Italian

    $$$

    Sexy is the only word to describe the candlelit, subterranean space, with its exposed brick, wide-plank floors, and bloodred walls. As for the food—the centerpiece of which is the traditional pasta made fresh by Galeano’s own mamma—that would do with anything from seductive or satisfying to just plain delicious. READ REVIEW

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    The Greenwich Project

    47 W. 8th St.

    Greenwich Village

    Cuisine: New American

    $$

    This sexy secret—and sibling of the Mulberry Project—serves unique plates that pack big flavor in an intimate and chic 74-seat townhouse. It's a party thanks to a stellar cocktail list, packed with buzzy ingredients like house-made "root" bitters, rose petal infused rye, and maple syrup, which come together to make drinks like the Rye, Roots & Roses. READ REVIEW

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    Hecho en Dumbo

    354 Bowery

    NoHo

    Cuisine: Mexican

    $$

    A light coating of vinegar-spiked oil clings like dew to each julienned strip of radish in the tangy ensalada de rábano. Delicious. But what are those silver-dollar-size slivers with the cherry pink centers, pretty enough to wear as a brooch? The chef, who just made the salad, is but a few feet away, looking out occasionally across the counter from the eat-in bar, so why not ask? Without missing a chop, Danny Mena shoots back: “Watermelon radishes, from Satur Farms on Long Island.” READ REVIEW

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    Highlands

    150 W. 10th St.

    West Village

    Cuisine: Bar, British, Pub, Steak

    $$

    Highlands, a lively gastropub that's both a stellar bar and an excellent restaurant, is so well-regarded for its expert cocktails and brown spirits selection that the food can get overlooked. And that's a mistake, because even the pubbiest selections here are executed with care. Take the Scotch egg, typically a baseball of a bar snack consisting of a hard-boiled egg wrapped in sausage and deep-fried. READ REVIEW

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    Hill Country

    30 W. 26th St.

    Flatiron

    Cuisine: Barbeque

    $$

    Hill Country has become the superlative city ’cue, its Texas dry-rub style—smoked “low and slow” over post oak—even making some critics’ national best barbecue lists. READ REVIEW

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    Hill Country Chicken

    1123 Broadway

    Flatiron

    Cuisine: Barbeque, Southern

    $$

    Marc Glosserman's respite for homesick Texans took Manhattan by storm with Hill Country Barbecue back in 2007 and still goes strong, channeling his father’s Lone Star roots. READ REVIEW

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    Hundred Acres

    38 MacDougal Street

    South Village

    Cuisine: New American

    $$

    Hundred Acres is a romantic charmer of a restaurant and sister restaurant to the popular Five Points and Cookshop, Hundred Acres. Expect hearty portions of familiar favorites, each with a slight twist. READ REVIEW

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    I SODI

    105 Christopher St.

    West Village

    Cuisine: Italian

    $$$

    Carrie Bradshaw and Marc Jacobs have radically changed the West Village, but Christopher Street still dotes on unhip bars and sex-toy boutiques. In the middle of it all sits I Sodi, whose owner, Rita Sodi, once a Calvin Klein executive, takes food as seriously as she once took jeans. The menu is small, but you’ll want everything. Villagers descended in ones, twos and threes, eating right at the bar, chatting with the chef and turning “the Sodi’s” little restaurant into one big block party. READ REVIEW

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    Il Buco

    47 Bond St.

    NoHo

    Cuisine: Italian

    $$$

    Here’s a place, on sleepy little Bond Street in NoHo, to rival any Tuscan country charmer in the categories of soft candlelight, hanging pots, and antique farmhouse tables. READ REVIEW


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