GUIDE: New York

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    L&W Oyster Co.

    254 Fifth Ave.

    Flatiron

    Cuisine: Seafood

    $$

    The fruits of the sea are the stars at this fun, quirky Flatiron District seafood shack, decorated with condiment-filled fry baskets, a vintage sign for Shell gas (are those bullet holes?), and, on the walls, magnetic poetry. Seek out the tender, briny Montauk Pearl oysters; for a fun pairing, try them with a local beer such as Chelsea Brewing’s light Checker Cab Blonde or roasty, chocolaty Black Hole XXX Stout. The fruits of the sea are the stars at this fun, quirky Flatiron District seafood shack. READ REVIEW

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    Lamazou

    370 Third Ave.

    Murray Hill

    $$

    The holiday season can be nerve-wracking, mainly due to the paralyzing inability to answer a single question: What gifts should you get your loved ones and friends? READ REVIEW

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    Landmarc

    Multiple Locations:
    Tribeca, Upper West Side

    Cuisine: Italian, New American

    $$$

    There’s nothing in the least bit fussy about Landmarc, which is part of what makes this spot so appealing. Combine that with a menu designed to please— from a guy who’s cooked with Alain Ducasse and Sylvain Portay, and you can see why this two-story room bustles at breakfast, lunch and dinner. READ REVIEW

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    Lazy Point

    310 Spring St.

    Hudson Square

    Cuisine: Bar

    $

    Owner Jason LaGarenne has dropped (The) Anchor—the nautical-themed bar that formerly occupied this space—along with much of the extravagance that went with it, for a more low-key seaside vibe, in the spirit of the Montauk neighbor that it’s named after. In this new guise, the indulgences are all channeled straight to the cocktail menu, and the deceptively refined bar bites. READ REVIEW

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    Le Coq Rico

    30 E. 20th St.

    Flatiron

    Cuisine: French

    $$

    To say chef Antoine Westermann has a pedigree is something of an understatement: He earned three coveted Michelin stars for his Le Buerehiesel in Stasbourg and now helms a mini-empire of restaurants in Paris. READ REVIEW

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    Le Fanfare

    1103 Manhattan Ave.

    Greenpoint

    Cuisine: Italian

    $$

    Every last detail here—from the hand-carved marble high-top tables for two with flowers and mood lighting, to the elegantly plated, perfectly shareable dishes—works to create an air of romance that should place it at the top of your list of special date night destinations. READ REVIEW

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    Le Perigord

    405 E. 52nd St.

    Midtown East

    Cuisine: French

    $$$

    To enter here is to breathe a sigh of relief; you are sure to be taken care of, spoiled even. The service is attentive and decidedly French, as it has been since the Briguet family opened the doors back in 1964. READ REVIEW

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    Le Rivage

    340 W. 46th St.

    Hell's Kitchen

    Cuisine: French

    $$

    The French initiated the first official culinary movement over a century ago with Auguste Escoffier’s brilliance and attention to detail leading the way; today, his recipes live on at Le Rivage on Restaurant Row. READ REVIEW

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    Left Bank

    117 Perry St.

    West Village

    Cuisine: New American

    $$

    Strolling through the West Village and down Hudson Street, you’ll see as many cuisine options as people in the Village. With all that variety, one of the best picks for local cuisine with an international touch is none other than Left Bank on Perry Street. Behind the scenes are partners Chef Laurence Edelman and Micheline Gaulin. Chef Laurence updates classic dishes and uses the best locally sourced ingredients. READ REVIEW

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    LoLo's Seafood Shack

    303 W. 116th Street

    Harlem

    Cuisine: Caribbean

    $$

    Sometimes all you need to do is overload on flavors from a faraway place to fool your brain into believing you’ve actually gotten away from the grind. At this instant culinary stay-cay, atisfy your craving for island fare without leaving Manhattan. READ REVIEW


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