GUIDE: New York

In Vino Veritas

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    Antler Beer and Wine Dispensary

    123 Allen St.

    Lower East Side

    Cuisine: Bar, Eclectic, Wine Bar

    $

    Antler is a throwback to a vanishing era when downtown bars doubled as informal living rooms—and to accompany the imbibing, New Mexico native Cecelia Bye has curated a menu of kicked-up small plates. READ REVIEW

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    Ardesia

    510 W. 52nd St.

    Hell's Kitchen

    Cuisine: New American, Wine Bar

    $$

    Ardesia, a lively wine bar on the fringe of the theater district, must have been designed with New York night owls in mind. The house-cured, house-smoked pastrami sandwich or the bánh mì make a nice little meal, especially if you kick it off with some artichoke-and-crab dip. Nobody’s in a rush here. READ REVIEW

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    Distilled NY

    211 West Broadway

    Tribeca

    Cuisine: New American

    $$$

    If you’ve ever wondered how fine-dining chefs might interpret bar staples (not to mention brunch), this is the place to feast and find out. READ REVIEW

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    El Colmado

    Gotham West Market, 600 11th Ave.

    Hell's Kitchen

    Cuisine: Spanish

    $$

    With snappy service and superb Spanish-style tapas, this bustling counter is the kind of place where one can pop in and out of for lunch or make a night of it at dinnertime. READ REVIEW

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    Fornino Williamsburg

    291 Kent Ave.

    Williamsburg

    Cuisine: Italian, Pizza

    $$

    An industry veteran who opened his first restaurant in 1977, Fornino’s chef and owner, Michael Ayoub, became the first Brooklyn chef to be reviewed by The New York Times, and was dubbed the “First Chef of Brooklyn” by them. READ REVIEW

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    Il Buco

    47 Bond St.

    NoHo

    Cuisine: Italian

    $$$

    Here’s a place, on sleepy little Bond Street in NoHo, to rival any Tuscan country charmer in the categories of soft candlelight, hanging pots, and antique farmhouse tables. READ REVIEW

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    Le Rivage

    340 W. 46th St.

    Hell's Kitchen

    Cuisine: French

    $$

    The French initiated the first official culinary movement over a century ago with Auguste Escoffier’s brilliance and attention to detail leading the way; today, his recipes live on at Le Rivage on Restaurant Row. READ REVIEW

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    Left Bank

    117 Perry St.

    West Village

    Cuisine: New American

    $$

    Strolling through the West Village and down Hudson Street, you’ll see as many cuisine options as people in the Village. With all that variety, one of the best picks for local cuisine with an international touch is none other than Left Bank on Perry Street. Behind the scenes are partners Chef Laurence Edelman and Micheline Gaulin. Chef Laurence updates classic dishes and uses the best locally sourced ingredients. READ REVIEW

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    Sauce

    78 Rivington St.

    Lower East Side

    Cuisine: Italian

    $$

    READ REVIEW

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    Socarrat

    Multiple Locations:
    Chelsea, Nolita, Midtown East

    Cuisine: Spanish , Tapas

    $$$

    Socarrat is a lot like its namesake ingredient: It does the behind-the-scenes—or, if you will, the bottom of the pan—things very well. And unlike many a Spanish destination in the city, the focus here has always been on the paella. READ REVIEW


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